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2023
1
January
What is the best way to exchange money or pay for things in a different currency?

What is the best way to exchange money or pay for things in a different currency?

When you travel, you have many different options when it comes to exchanging money or paying for things in a different currency.

While there are many options, I can guarantee you one thing, any time you exchange money or pay for things in a different currency, *someone* is taking a minimum of 3% of every transaction from you as a foreign exchange fee.

They are taking this fee in at least one of two ways:

* an obvious fee that they tell you about upfront

and / or

* a hidden fee, by using an inflated exchange rate that is worse than today's 'real' exchange rate

Inflated exchange rates - the hidden fee

A lot of people aren't aware of the hidden fee. For example, if today's 'real' exchange rate between Canadian and U.S. dollars is 1.30, they are charging you an inflated rate of 1.34 - and pocketing the 3% difference as a fee for themselves.

Unless you actually look at your receipt or credit card statement, and compare the exchange rate they used, against the 'real' exchange rate from a currency exchange site (like XE.com) - you will have no idea about this hidden fee.

And by *they* I mean every bank, currency exchange center, ATM machine, and credit card in the world. They all want their 3% fee from you.

Ways you can exchange money - from worst to best


Method Obvious Fee Inflated Exchange Rate
Airport exchange kiosk        
Your bank at home    
Good independent currency exchange place at home
ATM in a different country
Prepaid cards (most of them)
Credit cards (most of them)
'Zero foreign exchange fee'
credit cards (rare)
  NONE   NOPE
'Zero foreign exchange fee'
prepaid cards (rare)
  NONE   NOPE


Yes, there are ways to avoid both the obvious fees *and* the hidden fees (inflated exchange rates)

When paying for something in a different currency, the two best types of products for avoiding fees are:

1. 'Zero foreign exchange fee' credit cards

2. 'Zero foreign exchange fee' prepaid cards

They're both useful in different ways, depending on your goal.

Credit cards are useful for purchasing things from stores or restaurants in other countries while avoiding foreign exchange fees and earning cash back or rewards at the same time.

Prepaid cards are useful for purchasing things from stores or restaurants in other countries and avoiding foreign exchange fees while withdrawing cash from the ATM.

• If you only care to see a list of my current recommendations for both types of products, click here to jump to the bottom of this article.

• If you would like a little more detail as to why they are my current recommendations for avoiding currency exchange fees, read on.

Free Credit Cards With Zero Foreign Transaction Fees

When your goals are:

• To purchase things in a foreign currency from stores, restaurants, and websites in other countries that accept credit cards and pay absolutely zero foreign transaction fees.

• To potentially earn cash back on top of the 3% you're already saving in foreign transaction fees.

Most of the free 'zero foreign transaction fee' credit cards have become worse over the past year or two.

The best free option right now is the Brim Financial Mastercard....

1. Brim Mastercard




Pros:

• Zero foreign transaction fees.

• Can earn points (1 point for every $1 spent).

• Can redeem points at any time and in any amount.

• Free Boingo wi-fi access.

Cons:

• Being a Mastercard, it won't work at U.S. Costco's.

• Seems to easily trigger fraud alerts while using it abroad. It's a good idea to have a backup card.

The other two free options are tied for second place...

2. Home Trust Preferred Visa




Pros:

• Zero foreign transaction fees.

• Being a Visa, it's useful as a backup to the Brim Mastercard.

Cons:

• No cash back on foreign exchange purchases (1% back on Canadian purchases).

• Your accumulated cash back credits only once a year.

• Its days might be numbered due to Smith Financial Corporation acquiring Home Capital Group.

2. Rogers World Elite Mastercard




Pros:

• 3% cash back rewards on purchases made in U.S. dollars, which compensates for the foreign exchange fee.

• 1.5% cash back rewards on purchases made in Canadian dollars.

• Actually has some decent insurance included, unlike the Brim or Home Trust cards.

Cons:

• Only useful for purchases made in U.S. Dollars.

• Has a minimum income requirement of $80,000 annual (personal) $150,000 (household).

The Rogers website *says* to maintain eligibility for this card, you must have an annual spend of $15,000 each year. As of yet, there have been no reports of this being enforced.

If the majority of your foreign currency purchases are in U.S. dollars the Rogers World Elite is a good free card to consider. For purchases in other currencies it is not useful.

Credit Cards With Zero Foreign Transaction Fees
(But Have An Annual Fee)

For credit cards with an annual fee it comes down to whether or not you actually value what they include for insurance, perks, etc, that free credit cards rarely include. Your personal spending habits are also an important factor (which determines your rewards).

There's no right answer for everyone. The first two cards listed here are the ones most Canadians debate over unless you're able to spend a decent amount using American Express.

1. HSBC World Elite Mastercard




• $149 annual fee (first year free)

• Zero foreign transaction fees

• Good choice for those who spend a lot on travel (3% back in travel rewards)

Insurance:

travel medical, bag delay, bag loss, trip cancellation, trip delay, rental car

Perks:

Boingo wi-fi, $100 travel credit, DragonPass lounge membership (but not lounge passes)

Cons:

• Being a Mastercard, it won't work at U.S. Costcos

• Its days might be numbered due to potential acquisition from RBC (but very early to speculate, the acquisition hasn't even been approved yet)



2. Scotiabank Passport Visa Infinite




• $150 annual fee (first year free)

• No foreign transaction fees

• Good choice for those who value lounge passes

Insurance:

travel medical, bag delay, bag loss, bag theft, hotel burglarly, trip cancellation, trip delay, rental car

Perks:

Visa lounge membership, 6 Plaza Premium lounge passes



3. Scotiabank Gold American Express




• $120 annual fee (first year free)

• No foreign transaction fees

Insurance:

travel medical, bag delay, bag loss, bag theft, hotel burglarly, trip cancellation, trip delay, rental car

Cons:

• American Express is not widely accepted outside North America


jump to:       Summary       Credit Cards       Prepaid Cards       Top



Prepaid Cards With Zero Foreign Transaction Fees

When your goals are:

• To purchase things in a foreign currency from stores, restaurants, and websites in other countries that accept credit cards and pay absolutely zero foreign transaction fees.

• To potentially earn cash back on top of the 3% you're already saving in foreign transaction fees.

• To withdraw cash from an ATM machine in another country and pay the lowest transaction fees possible.

You typically load prepaid cards using funds from your bank account.

There are a handful of prepaid cards that are useful for purchasing things or withdrawing cash from an ATM in another country and avoiding fees while doing so.

With virtually all other prepaid cards, a 3% currency conversion fee is taken from you at some point. It could be when you use the card, or when you load it with funds. It's usually a hidden fee (built into the exchange rate) so most people are unaware.

1. Wise Prepaid Visa




Wise has been around since 2011 (they used to be known as TransferWise). The important thing to know about Wise is that from the very beginning their goal was to offer lower transaction fees than the traditional banks with everything they do.

Whether it's exchanging currency, loading funds in a different currency, or buying things in a different currency, their goal is to offer very low fees and be transparent about what those fees are.

For many travellers the Wise card is a great choice for buying things while abroad, or withdrawing reasonable amounts from ATMs in other countries.

From an ATM...

...if you withdraw $350 or less in a month there are zero foreign transaction fees.

... if you withdraw more than $350 in a month, you pay a 1.75% foreign transaction fee on the amount over $300. (Which is still pretty decent compared to the 3-3.5% fee that virtually every bank or prepaid card will charge you).

...if you make more than 2 withdrawals in a month, you pay $1.50 for each additional withdrawal.

Pros:

* The only prepaid card on the Canadian market that reliably supports 3-D Secure (3DS), which is an extra layer of security for transactions.

Cons:

* If you're going to be withdrawing higher amounts from ATMs (or more frequently) you may want to look into the Wealthsimple Prepaid Mastercard below.



2. Wealthsimple Prepaid Mastercard




Pros:

* 1% interest on your balance

* 1% cashback, crypto, or stock (your choice)

* 0% foreign transaction fees

* $0 ATM withdrawals both within and outside of Canada

* Higher ATM withdrawal limits ($500 per transaction, $1k daily, 3 transactions per day)

Cons:

* Being a Mastercard, it won't work at U.S. Costcos

* The reason Wealthsimple can offer this free card with such attractive features is that they hope you'll be convinced to also use their other investment services. It's essentially a loss leader product for them. As a result the signup process can feel a little more invasive than other prepaid cards, such as asking for your SIN.


jump to:       Summary       Credit Cards       Prepaid Cards       Top



3. EQ Bank Prepaid Mastercard




Pros:

* 2.5% interest on your balance

* 0.5% cash back

* 0% foreign transaction fees

Cons:

* Being a Mastercard, it won't work at U.S. Costcos

The EQ Bank Prepaid Mastercard is the new kid on the block. It's meant to compete with the WealthSimple Prepaid Mastercard.

They both help you avoid the typical 2.5% foreign transaction fee when buying something or withdrawing from an ATM in another country.

The main difference is that EQ Bank gives you a higher interest rate on your balance (2.5% versus 1% with WealthSimple), but slightly less cash back (0.5% versus 1% with WealthSimple).


jump to:       Summary       Credit Cards       Prepaid Cards       Top



Summary Of The Best Zero Foreign Transaction Fee Products To Use - Depending On Your Goal

GoalBest Product To UseBest Choices
Purchase things from stores or restaurants where credit cards are accepted *and* earn cash back or rewards.Zero Foreign Transaction Fee Credit CardFree

Brim Mastercard

Home Trust Preferred Visa

Rogers World Elite Mastercard



Annual Fee

HSBC World Elite Mastercard

Scotiabank Passport Visa Infinite

Scotiabank Gold American Express


GoalBest Product To UseBest Choices
Purchase things from stores or restaurants where credit cards are accepted.Zero Foreign Transaction Fee Prepaid CardWise Prepaid Visa

Wealthsimple Prepaid Mastercard

EQ Bank Prepaid Mastercard


GoalBest Product To UseBest Choices
Withdraw cash from an ATM machine in another country and pay the lowest transaction fees possible. Zero Foreign Transaction Fee Prepaid CardWise Prepaid Visa

Wealthsimple Prepaid Mastercard

EQ Bank Prepaid Mastercard

jump to:       Summary       Credit Cards       Prepaid Cards       Top



Other tips for exchanging money or paying for things while traveling


Are there any major Canadian banks that allow you to avoid paying high fees when making ATM withdrawals in other countries?

All major banks will charge the 3-3.5% hidden fee (inflated exchange rate) but Tangerine / Scotiabank is the one bank that won't charge the additional obvious fee, if you withdraw from an ATM in the Global Alliance.

ATMs in the Global Alliance include: Bank of America (in the U.S.), Scotiabank (in Mexico, Caribbean, Central America or South America), and Deutsche Bank (in Europe).

You can find a complete list of ATMs in the Global Alliance here.

What about withdrawing cash using my credit card?

This is generally a bad idea. Most credit cards consider this a cash advance, and start charging you interest immediately.

Yes, there are sometimes ways around the interest charge, by overpaying your credit card first, but this can still be a bad idea for other reasons, and you'll still be charged a cash advance fee.

TIP: If the machine gives you a choice, choose to be charged in the currency of the country you're in.

When you're in another country, and the debit or credit machine asks if you would like to be charged in your home currency (Canadian dollars) - do *not* select this option.

It may seem like a good idea, but what's really happening when you select that option is that the machine's provider is determining the exchange rate when calculating the amount you will be charged in $CAD.

I guarantee that this will be an even more inflated exchange rate than the one that Visa or Mastercard uses.

What you want to do is select the option to be charged in the currency of the country you're in, and let Visa or Mastercard use their typical 2.5% inflated exchange rate.

Beware: I have heard that with some machines, if you use the tap method to pay, you may not even be asked, and it will automatically charge you in $CAD, with the terrible exchange rate.

Is there a way to avoid foreign exchange fees when sending an international money transfer?

You may want to look into Wise.

They use the real exchange rate, without the hidden 3% markup. There is still an obvious fee (small percentage and fixed fee) but they are transparent about it.

What currency should I use in Mexico?

Pesos are the best currency to use in Mexico. Using $USD means both you and the person you're paying are each losing 3%.

Convert some Canadian dollars to Pesos before you go, or withdraw them from the ATM when you get there.

When using the ATMs in Mexico, choose the legitimate bank ATMs. Not the street ATMs.

Jump to: Summary of the best 'zero foreign exchange fee' products to use

Jump to: The best 'zero foreign exchange fee' credit cards

Jump to: The best 'zero foreign exchange fee' prepaid cards

Jump to: Top of this article











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22 Responses to "What is the best way to exchange money or pay for things in a different currency?"


    Has Jessica been here?
       Jessica on June 9th, 2018

    I found a better place in Richmond called Pyramid currency exchange, I always go there and always get the best rate, free parking and no line up.

    Has Lucky Strike been here?
       Lucky Strike on June 10th, 2018

    You can actually get a Fido/Rogers Mastercard which has zero annual fee and you get 3% back on foreign currency purchases, which minus the 2.5% exchange fee means you save 0.5% on all foreign currency purchases.

    (Note: The card earns reward points which can be redeemed for cash once per year which equals 3% back)

    Has Jennifer been here?
       Jennifer on June 10th, 2018

    Lucky, that one is mentioned in the article.

    Has Nigel been here?
       Nigel on June 30th, 2018

    You are missing a mention of the MasterCard offered by Brim:
    https://brimfinancial.com
    Also 0% foreign transaction fee and some interesting extra benefits.

    Has Chris_Myden been here?
       Chris_Myden on June 30th, 2018

    Hi Nigel,

    From what I understand the launch of the Brim card has never materialized and keeps being delayed month after month. The company itself is apparently fraught with issues. At this point it's essentially vaporware.

    Has Stephen been here?
       Stephen on July 1st, 2018

    Again, when travelling to the US I simply go to the checkout at Walmart ( or other grocers. At Walmart there is no fee and the exchange rate in competitive . I use my credit union debit card ( they auto charge to a linked cheque in acct ) that way there is no credit card fee . Sweet .
    Does anyone know of other countries where grocery store chains give cash advances and accept debit cards from Canada ?

    Bankrupt ATM s !! ????

    Has Ian MacDonell been here?
       Ian MacDonell on July 3rd, 2018

    Just to point out that "Tangerine" is owned by Scotiabank and so if you already have a Scotiabank card you can withdraw money from ATM's owned by Global Alliance banks without having an account with "Tangerine" as well. I ended up with an account with "Tangerine" when Scotiabank bought the business from ING. I fired them after some pretty stunning incompetence and serious privacy breaches.

    Has Frank been here?
       Frank on July 3rd, 2018

    Thanks for your blog which I send to lots of people I know & meet. Exchanging Canadian $'s at casinos such as the Silver Reef across the border who give an advantageous rate is another option. They expect you to gamble with it but don't enforce spending there. On the Tangerine topic in Manzanillo the card doesn't work at Scotiabank!! If you call before leaving Tangerine will refund any bank fees you incur. Keep up the great work.

    Has Mike been here?
       Mike on July 17th, 2018

    Can you please expand on your comment:

    "Yes, there are sometimes ways around the interest charge, by overpaying your credit card first, but this can still be a bad idea for other reasons..."?

    Thanks!

    Has Chris Myden been here?
       Chris Myden on July 17th, 2018

    Hi Mike,

    One way it can backfire is that overpayment of credit cards can sometimes trigger fraud alerts or card cancellations from the credit card company. I think there are some schemes out there that criminals use involving credit card overpayment.

    But I would imagine it may only be an issue if you overpay your card numerous times, or overpay it by a lot.

    And some credit cards may have no problem with it at all. I mainly just want to make sure people don't consider it a good option unless they've really looked into it first.

    Has Craig P been here?
       Craig P on June 10th, 2019

    There’s a place with wicked rates downtown vancouver. Gastown Collectibles on pender st and Seymour st

    Has Rob T been here?
       Rob T on July 3rd, 2019

    Charlies Currency Exchange in Vancouver on Granville near Robson offers the best rates I've found for cash exchange and they carry quite a few currencies. It is good to call ahead to confirm they have enough of the currency you need.

    Has Chris Myden been here?
       Chris Myden on July 3rd, 2019

    Thanks Rob! I've heard that Charlie's is cash only.

    Has Don S. been here?
       Don S. on July 3rd, 2019

    Hi Chris:
    You touched on this but here's my 2 cents worth.

    I have used Brim for for about a year now. Their rates are the same as (maybe slightly better) XE.com (I check this rate every day). They give 1% back, which is nice. I also like how they email me a few minutes after a purchase to inform me that one was made (just in case I didn't make it).

    I'd give it a solid 8 of 10 (looses points on not being able to set up auto monthly payments from my bank account).

    Has June Wing been here?
       June Wing on July 4th, 2019

    On its website Rogers says it charges the 2.5% foreign currency commission.

    Has Chris Myden been here?
       Chris Myden on July 4th, 2019

    Hi June,

    The Rogers cards charge the 2.5% foreign exchange fee, but this fee is negated by the 3% or 4% back that you receive when making a purchase in a foreign currency.

    Another way to think of it is a 0% foreign exchange fee and an additional 0.5% to 1.5% back.

    Has Chris Myden been here?
       Chris Myden on July 16th, 2019

    Thanks Don - I think Brim is worth another look, now that they have their issues sorted out.

    Has Gili been here?
       Gili on December 17th, 2019

    Thanks for putting this page together. I got the Rogers World Elite card and the issue with it is a measly 500CAD daily withdrawal limit. Since they charge $5 for this, that's a 1% charge (at least). I have another World Elite Mastercard that allows me to draw out way more than that (if you have access to an ATM that will allow this). So, it works, but I wouldn't have it as my only card for overseas use. I asked if they could increase the limit and they said they are unable to change it. Consider adding the daily withdrawal limit for each card on this page, perhaps?

    Has Chris Myden been here?
       Chris Myden on December 30th, 2019

    Hi Gili,

    Just to clarify, you are withdrawing cash on your credit card, aka a cash advance?

    Personally, I would never recommend that anyone do this, due to the fact that credit cards immediately start charging you interest on cash advances. This will quickly outweigh any benefit that the card provides.

    Has Richard been here?
       Richard on February 10th, 2020

    I've been using the "Stack" MasterCard since last September. The app works great for loading the card and both ATM and POS seem to work well.

    Has Michael Foster been here?
       Michael Foster on March 4th, 2020

    Theres this place in downtown Vancouver, they accept debit too! www.gciexchange.com Gastown Currency Exchange

    They always have all currencies in stock so no need to wait!

    Has Samuel Moore been here?
       Samuel Moore on January 17th, 2021

    Wow, I didn't know that there are credit cards that don't charge foreign exchange fees at all. For sure these credit cards are hard to find so thanks for sharing, I'll try my luck and hopefully be able to get one. At the moment, I've always converted my money from CAD to USD and the other way around through this site https://www.knightsbridgefx.com/currency-exchange-london-ontario/ because they have always offered the best exchange rate that I could find online. Their rates are also lower than banks by 1% - 2% since they have less overhead fees than most traditional financial institutions which allows them to convert money without the need for inflated rates. I really wish I could get one of the cards listed in here so I could go cashless the next time I travel abroad.

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